Feeling the Hangover from the Holidays? Commit the Rest of Month to Drynuary

Posted on Jan 6, 2017 in DUI/DWI, Uncategorized

Glass mug or tankard of cold frothy beer standing on a wooden table in a bar or pub, high angle view

December and all its festivities are over.  As we’ve finally packed away all the decorations from Christmas, Chanukah, and New Years Eve, you may have found that you’ve packed on a few pounds here or there from indulging in decadent dinners and cocktails.

New Orleans is known across the US as a great place to drink—and with plenty of drive-thru daiquiris spots, alcohol-infused concerts and festivals, and one of the nation’s only open-container locales, we pride ourselves as a fun and energetic city.  But even though we’re in our first week of January, it’s not too late to commit yourself to foregoing alcohol for the rest of the month—a practice known as Drynuary.  It’s a New Years resolution that’s even tougher sticking to in town like New Orleans.

The term Drynuary was coined in 2007 by John Ore, and since has began to gain steam among drinkers who want to reset from December.  January offers a good time frame to lay off the liquor for a couple weeks, especially as a well-needed cleanse as we gear up for getting back outdoors for the endless number of festivals leading up to Mardi Gras.

Along with cutting down on your calorie intake (and hopefully helping you shed any unwanted weight gained at the end of 2016), abstaining from alcohol for a set period of time has been proven to empower problem drinkers with learning how to say “no.”  For many of us, alcohol is an ingrained part of our life, our culture, our fabric—I know plenty of Saints fans who chase nachos down with a couple of sudsy Budweisers during game time. But being able to say “no” to alcohol and “yes” to a healthier lifestyle in January is a great way to jumpstart 2017, and will give you all the more reason to enjoy a couple drinks come February.

Have you committed an alcohol-related crime?

Here at Bloom Legal, we recognize that alcoholism is a disease. We recommend moderate consumption of alcohol, but that sometimes the ability to resist drinking may be out of your control. Over-consumption of alcohol can lead to choices that may put you or others at risk, and if you’ve been charged with an alcohol-related crime, we want to help you.

Give us a call at 504-599-9997.

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